Types of dating violence

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[...] It will be argued that in order to end 'wife beating,' it is essential for women also to end what many regard as a 'harmless' pattern of slapping, kicking, or throwing something at a male partner who persists in some outrageous behavior and 'won't listen to reason.' reports that a 13-year longitudinal study found that a woman's aggression towards a man was equally important as the man's tendency towards violence in predicting the likelihood of overall violence: "Since much IPV [Intimate Partner Violence] is mutual and women as well as men initiate IPV, prevention and treatment approaches should attempt to reduce women's violence as well as men's violence.

Such an approach has a much higher chance of increasing women's safety." However, Capaldi's research only focused on at-risk youth, not women in general, and, therefore, may not apply to the entire population.

Abuse can occur regardless of the couple's age, race, income, or other demographic traits.

There are, however, many traits that abusers and victims share in common.

Dating abuse or dating violence is the perpetration or threat of an act of violence by at least one member of an unmarried couple on the other member in the context of dating or courtship.

It also arises when one partner tries to maintain power and control over the other through abuse or violence, for example when a relationship has broken down.

Violence in entertainment is everywhere and, unfortunately, has been normalized.

Teens mimic behaviors they see on screen, so it is not uncommon for teens to think the unhealthy relationships that are portrayed are normal or just a part of life everyone is subject to deal with.

Healthy relationships, however, require hard work, communication, and a level of maturity that may not be present in teens.

Dating violence crosses all racial, age, economic and social lines.

The Center for Relationship Abuse Awareness describes dating abuse as a "pattern of abusive and coercive behaviors used to maintain power and control over a former or current intimate partner." Individuals of all walks of life can find themselves in an abusive relationship.

Nearly 25% of teenage girls are estimated to have been in an abusive relationship.

In fact, girls between 16 and 24 are as likely than any other demographic to be abused by a boyfriend or other intimate partner.

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